Building Language with Halloween Sensory Bags

Building Language With Halloween Sensory Bags

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In last week’s post we reviewed the amazing book, “Sensory Processing 101and tried out the Sensory Bags activity from the book. As a Speech Pathologist I was so excited to discover sensory bags and bottles because they are not only great for sensory exploration, but they provide so many opportunities for language building and can be customized to each child’s interests. Plus children have an easier time learning and talking when their sensory needs are met. This makes Sensory Bags a win/win for this mama SLP!

Halloween Sensory Bags

My kids and I loved the sensory bags from the book so much that we decided to make more with a Halloween theme. My family loves Halloween! How about yours?

To create our bags we used clear hair gel (we used soap for a few and it seemed to leak more often), fuzzy balls, googly eyes, witch hat stickers, glow sticks, glow dinosaurs, 2 freezer bags for each, masking tape/packing tape, decorative tape, and of course glitter! You can really use any small items you have around the house. Visit last week’s post to see the recipe for Sensory Bags from the “Sensory Processing 101” book.

Here are some of the materials we used for the Halloween sensory bags:

Building Language With Halloween Sensory Bags

 

These are the bags we made. We named them: Sparkle Witch Hat Bag, Oooey Gooey Googly Eye Bag, Colorful Halloween Fuzzy Ball Bag, Creepy Creatures Bag, & Ghoulish Glow Bag

Building Language With Halloween Sensory Bags


 

These are the language concepts we talked about (don’t feel like you have to address all of these at once. We wouldn’t usually do this many bags in a row):

  1. Sequencing words: first, then
  2. Following directions: my 6 year old read each step and told her sister how to do it (and of course I helped her out when she needed it)
  3. Colors: purple, green, orange, black, etc.
  4. Descriptive words to describe the sensory experience (“how does the bag feel?”): gooey, squishy, colorful, glowing, bright, dark, glittery, sparkly, etc
  5. Vocabulary words to talk about: bats, spiders, witches, eyeballs, snakes, witch, hat
  6. We read a few Halloween books later in the day and talked about the items we recognized from the sensory bags
  7. We sang the “Itsy Bitsy Spider” for a little added fun!

 

General tips for building language that go along with creating and playing with Sensory Bags:

  1. Work on sequencing and following directions:
    • Let your child help you lay out the ingredients and follow the steps to make the bag. Let them make choices about what they want to put in and talk about the things they chose.
  2. Talk about the sensory experience:
    • When the bag is done, let your child feel the bag and play with the bag. Ask them questions that allow them to tap into their senses. How does the bag feel? What do they see inside the bag?
  3. Choose items or themes of interest:
    •  Let your child pick out the theme or choose to do a mish-mosh of a bunch of things they like. You can also expose your child to new concepts they are learning about (letters, sounds, animals, colors, shapes, numbers, and the list goes on). These bags are great for building vocabulary!
  4. Extend the concepts across contexts:
    • Sing songs, read books, and talk about real life examples of the concepts the sensory bags included to build background knowledge.
  5. For babies and toddlers, simply modify the above items to their ability level. This might look like: describing the bags to them using your senses and letting them explore the bags using theirs. Ask them questions about what they are experiencing and pause to allow them to respond (it’s ok if they don’t respond, you can always model what they could say after you pause).

(Note: Parent supervision needed at all times when making and playing with these bags, if you notice the bags tear, or leak, dispose of them immediately, use glow sticks at your own risk.)

Check out this awesome list from the “Sensory Processing 101” book on ideas for sensory bag/bottle fillers:

Halloween Sensory Bags

The Sensory Processing 101 Ebook is now on sale for $9.99 until October, 1st (normally $19.99)

  • PLUS ALL THESE FREEBIES:
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Get this awesome e-book HERE!!

 

 

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12 comments on Building Language with Halloween Sensory Bags

    • Alison Edelstein
      Alison Edelstein (author)

      Thanks Holly! 🙂

  • Aspen Jay

    Thanks for these ideas Alison! I am always looking for activities like this for my toddlers. Thanks for sharing at Talented Tuesday.

    Cheers,
    AJ

    • Alison Edelstein
      Alison Edelstein (author)

      Thanks Aspen! So glad you liked them! 🙂

  • misty shaheen

    These are great! My son has apraxia and will love these!

    • Alison Edelstein
      Alison Edelstein (author)

      So glad you like them! I was so excited when I discovered them in the book and am excited to use them more often as a fun speech therapy tool. Hope your son enjoys them too!:)

  • Tina Peterson

    Thanks – I will have to make up a couple of these. We don’t do a lot with halloween but it will give me ideas for more of a FALL theme. =D

    • Alison Edelstein
      Alison Edelstein (author)

      That’s a great idea! The beauty of sensory bags is that you can make them using any theme, season, or holiday. 🙂

  • Emma

    That eyeball bag is delightfully icky, lol! These are so fun for Halloween. I love sensory bags because even babies can get in on the fun! #ThoughtfulSpot

    • Alison Edelstein
      Alison Edelstein (author)

      Thanks Emma! I agree, sensory bags are super fun for all ages! 🙂

  • Valerie

    Such a great idea, I will have to do this with Keira!

    • Alison Edelstein
      Alison Edelstein (author)

      Thanks Val! 🙂

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